Professional Passion: What It Is, Isn't, Should and Shouldn't Be


Even if professional passion is explicitly, unequivocally and unanimously definable, questions remain: Should passion be any of these things listed? Should it be a prerequisite, expectation, concomitant or—as Alexander Pope framed it—master or slave of some (which ones?) or all jobs? When, if ever, and in what forms, is work (job or career) passion a delusion, a deception, a danger, an illusion, an encumbrance, handicap or otherwise a "mistake" and liability?

By downloading the eBook, you hereby agree to the Recruiter.com terms of use and privacy policy.
Professional Passion: What It Is, Isn't, Should and Shouldn't Be

What you will learn in this eBook

Passion Is in Fashion


Clearly, these twin tasks are timely and very modern. Despite a long prior history of theological, philosophical, psychological and linguistic negative associations—e.g., with uncivilized, out­ of­ control, crude and passive instinctual (as opposed to reflective) reactions or passively endured suffering (as in "the Passion of Christ"), "passion" (especially "professional passion") has been, in the past century or so, rehabilitated and currently designates "a good thing" for those who seek or offer it.

Hence, these days, for one reason or one way or another, employers and workers have to come to terms with and understand professional passion—whether or not it is their own, or whether or not they like it.

About the author

Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa, writer for Recruiter.com, is a former editor and writer with China Daily News, Hong Kong edition and Editor-in-chief, Business Insight Japan Magazine, Tokyo; he has also been a columnist with one of Japan's national newspapers, The Daily Yomiuri, and a university lecturer (critical thinking and philosophy) in Canada, China and Japan.
Professional Passion: What It Is, Isn't, Should and Shouldn't Be