The "Big 5" Personality Tests, Measure and Models: An Advanced Beginner's Q&A


This report will undertake a logical examination and assessment of the "Big 5" personality tests and their value to beginners, who are unlikely to have a background in psychometrics and advanced statistics.

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What you will learn in this eBook

In its most ambitious characterizations, the “Big 5” represents one attempt to fulfill a longstanding dream and ambition of psychologists: to formulate the most compact list of human traits necessary and sufficient to at least accurately and precisely describe (if not also explain, control and/or predict) all of the elements of personality (like the periodic table of elements in chemistry—calcium,, oxygen, thorium, sodium, etc., from which all compounds are formed and in terms of which all chemical interactions can be analyzed, explained and predicted).

As it turns out, in the case of the Big 5, its purported validity is not universal in every sense of the term, e.g., it is primarily applied in connection with adult personality, although research into and with children's versions has been carried out). There are plenty of researchers who will deny that, in any extant form, the Big 5 or any analogue can be universal and complete in the way that the periodic table of elements is (for now) or, in its present forms, necessary and sufficient to “account” for all personality traits.

About the author

Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa, writer for Recruiter.com, is a former editor and writer with China Daily News, Hong Kong edition and Editor-in-chief, Business Insight Japan Magazine, Tokyo; he has also been a columnist with one of Japan's national newspapers, The Daily Yomiuri, and a university lecturer (critical thinking and philosophy).
The "Big 5" Personality Tests, Measure and Models: An Advanced Beginner's Q&A