Welcome to Recruiter Q&A, where we pose employment-related questions to the experts and share their answers! Have a question you’d like to ask? Leave it in the comments, and you might just see it in the next installment of Recruiter Q&A!

Today’s Question: So much depends on a job seeker’s interactions with recruiters. And yet, many job seekers lack knowledge about what, exactly, recruiters do. Let’s make the recruiting process a little more transparent: What are some things that you think all job seekers should know about recruiters and the recruiting process?

Mike1. You Have to Give Recruiters a Reason to Hire You

What is always comical to me as a recruiter and former corporate manager is the misconception applicants have about being interviewed or hired. So often, I hear things like, “No one is hiring. I interviewed everywhere and no one is hiring.”

No, they are hiring – just not hiring you! Do you really think companies would devote the money and manpower to looking for qualified applicants if they weren’t going to hire them? Kind of stupid when you think about it, isn’t it?

What recruiters want is for you to demonstrate to them a reason to hire you. They need to hire someone, they want to hire someone – why can’t it be you? Give them a reason. Help them do their job! Do or say something to give them a reason to want you.

Mike Smith, Salescoaching1

Leila2. Recruiters Don’t Work for You

The No. 1 thing individuals need to know about third-party recruiters is that you are not their client – the company/employer is. The better you make them look to their clients by preparing for your interviews and exuding professionalism throughout the process, the more willing they will be to send your application to their other clients.

Even if you don’t get hired for the first job they recommend you to, they will be more than happy to recommend you for future positions. They don’t work for you, but recruiters can be invaluable in your job search process if you treat them well and impress their clients!

Leila Hock, Alignment Coaching

Tricia3. Listen to What a Recruiter Is Telling You

Job seekers should respect the advice they receive from recruiters. When they tell you it’s not a fit, that’s because they know it’s not a fit. A good recruiter knows the client and understands what they are looking for in terms of skills and company culture. Know when to stop selling yourself and listen to the recruiter.

Tricia Lucas, Lucas Select

Kathleen4. Recruiters Pay Attention to Everything You Do

As recruiters, our main job function is to select and discern top talent. We are looking at everything candidates say, do, and respond to in order to determine whether they are the right fit for our customer.

It’s important for recruiters to create and maintain long-term relationships with customers, and we will only submit candidates whom we think are in it for the long haul. We make judgements quickly because in this industry, we have to. We’ve learned that giving candidates the benefit of the doubt never works.

Kathleen Steffey, Naviga Recruiting & Executive Search

Heather5. It’s a Good Idea to Keep Recruiters Informed

Job seekers should stay in close contact with recruiters when they have other interviews or may be getting close to the offer stage. Keeping recruiters in the know enables them to put a sense of urgency on their clients to move forward in the process before you go off the market.

Heather Tarrillion, Addison Group

Alysse6. Know When to Give Up

If you don’t hear back from a recruiter and follow up one or two times and
still don’t hear back, you didn’t get the job. They have been too focused on stronger candidates, so don’t hold your breath for a call back.

Alysse Metzler, Recruiting Snitch

Amber7. Make Sure You Address That Red Flag

If there’s a red flag on your resume you think a recruiter should know about, it’s in your best interest to share it with them. They’ll be asked about those red flags in situations where you’re not there to respond, so give them what they need to present you in a positive light. If you’re not forthcoming about gaps in your resume or why you were let go from a company, you may be passed on.

Amber M. Weinberg, Betts Recruiting

Like this article? Subscribe today! We also offer tons of free eBooks on career and recruiting topics - check out Get a Better Job the Right Way and Why It Matters Who Does Your Recruiting.
in Recruitment Process]