jobsAccording to a national survey from Dice Holdings Inc., a leading provider of employment websites, hiring professionals anticipate steady job creation in the first half of 2013. Almost half (46 percent) of the 1,100 hiring professionals polled reported expecting additional hiring during the first half of 2013 compared to the second half of 2012.

Forty-four percent of hiring managers and recruiters said current economic conditions aren’t impacting their hiring plans. Around 4 in 10 respondents (38 percent) said they envisioned hiring entry-level staffers in early 2013, up from one-third (33 percent) who envisioned adding entry-level hires during the second half of 2012. On the flip side,  more HR managers expect to fill positions requiring two to five years of experience and six to 10 years of experience to start 2013.

“As opposed to a fresh start, employers and employees seem to be entering 2013 ready to hold on to the status quo. While it may feel like a good amount of running in place, it’s important to remember more than 1.3 million private sector jobs have been created this year and business conditions point to continued modest job growth,” said Scot Melland, Chairman, President CEO, Dice Holdings, Inc.  “If greater confidence returns, I firmly believe hiring managers and professionals will be emboldened to act more decisively.”

A majority of corporate hiring managers (55 percent) believe that current employees will receive a raise in the upcoming year, the first raise expectation in more than a year. Although salaries seem to be slightly increasing for most existing staffers, the same cannot be said for new-hire compensations.  Just 43 percent of hiring professionals expect to offer higher initial salaries for new recruits during the first six months of 2013 than those who held that expectation during the latter half of 2012.



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