'Bringing Jobs Back to America': What Does That Mean and How Could It Be Done?


In addition to any vagueness about the (untested or unexamined) multiplicity of ways to bring jobs home, the challenge of thinking clearly about and succeeding is compounded by vagueness and ambiguity of some other key concepts central to bringing jobs back to America (or anywhere else, for that matter).

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'Bringing Jobs Back to America': What Does That Mean and How Could It Be Done?

What you will learn in this eBook

More Than One Way to Bring Jobs Home

However moot and confusing the data and conflicting claims and counterclaims, what is more certain is that, as Cheng points out, there is more than one way for jobs to "return": In addition to the literal return of companies and jobs, there is at least a second way—foreign direct investment and location of new or replacement operations, e.g., in the U.S.

However, because this process can provoke angst at home about foreign "takeover" of U.S. properties and infrastructure, control of American workers livelihoods and workplace practices (such as compulsory morning exercises or language lessons), foreign political lobbying and other influence, regulatory and corporate jurisdictional disputes, siphoning off of profits to a foreign power, etc., as a jobs option, it is unlikely to be as vigorously and openly advanced or discussed as ticker-tape paraded reshoring.

About the author

Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa, writer for Recruiter.com, is a former editor and writer with China Daily News, Hong Kong edition and Editor-in-chief, Business Insight Japan Magazine, Tokyo; he has also been a columnist with one of Japan's national newspapers, The Daily Yomiuri, and a university lecturer (critical thinking and philosophy) in Canada, China and Japan.
'Bringing Jobs Back to America': What Does That Mean and How Could It Be Done?