Future Jobs or 'Useless Eaters'?: Analytical Futurology vs. Predictive Futurology Perspectives


A key challenge to work futurists and those who rely on them is to consider the logically possible and imaginable ways in which work without jobs (or even without exchange) might be sustained in a world without jobs.

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Future Jobs or 'Useless Eaters'?: Analytical Futurology vs. Predictive Futurology Perspectives

What you will learn in this eBook

With the scary and inspiring accelerating ascendance and prospective workplace dominance of robots, intelligent software and automation, are the young and the as yet unborn facing a future without jobs or without work of any kind? Is it conceivable that, because of such technological advances, youth unemployment rates of 50% and higher, e.g., in Greece in 2015, will not only soar higher, but also engulf all age groups and transform virtually everyone except the most "talented" and "useful" into "useless eaters"?

Imagine a state unemployment office staffed with the likes of British eugenicist, Fabian socialist and playwright George Bernard Shaw, who, in this March 1931 newsreel interview suggested (in apparent, but not universally perceived, seriousness, since the Shaw Society claims it was all satire and mugging for the camera)) that at least some individuals (including the idle rich) periodically be served a notice to "justify your existence" (in terms of consumption vs. production) before a review board.

On a more clearly serious note and as a question posed in a commentary in The Economist succinctly put it:

"What happens... when machines are smart enough to become workers? In other words, when capital becomes labor [as a factor of production].

About the author

Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa
Michael Moffa, writer for Recruiter.com, is a former editor and writer with China Daily News, Hong Kong edition and Editor-in-chief, Business Insight Japan Magazine, Tokyo; he has also been a columnist with one of Japan's national newspapers, The Daily Yomiuri, and a university lecturer (critical thinking and philosophy).
Future Jobs or 'Useless Eaters'?: Analytical Futurology vs. Predictive Futurology Perspectives