Is a Degree a Bad Job Investment


What are the odds that all of that college and university time, money and the associated alternative cash-flow opportunities will have been squandered in the pursuit of a dream job doomed to elusively recede into the permanent fog of the 21st century?

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Is a Degree a Bad Job Investment

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That's not only a very timely question; it's also an ambiguous one, given that so many recent grads in 2015 find themselves underemployed at jobs that will never be careers, assuming they are employed at all. That second meaning of the ambiguous question is this: "Is a degree a badjob investment" (as opposed to "a bad job-investment")? That is, what are the odds that all of that college and university time, money and the associated alternative cash-flow opportunities will have been squandered in the pursuit of a dream job doomed to elusively recede into the permanent fog of a 21st-century bad (and not even full-time) job?

By contrast, a "bad job-investment" is a bad investment in what may be a good job, which suggests that although the job may be a great one, getting a degree may not be a great way to get it, as Silicon Valley's most famous drop-out IT titans and tycoons have proved.

There is a third sense in which a degree may be a "bad job investment": when a specific degree is worse than other degrees or the "average degree" as preparation and qualification for a (good or bad) job. This is in contrast to the more sensationalist and unsupportable insinuated interpretation that all degrees are a bad job investment. This third ambiguity would be more obvious if the title of this report were "Is Your Degree a Bad Job Investment?"

Is a Degree a Bad Job Investment