Coin, Vending, and Amusement Machine Servicers and Repairers

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Also known as:
Arcade Games Mechanic, Coin Box Collector, Juke Box Mechanic, Parking Meter Collector, Slot Machine Mechanic, Slot Technician, Stamp Machine Servicer, Vending Machine Filler

ABOUT COIN, VENDING, OR AMUSEMENT MACHINE SERVICERS OR REPAIRER CAREERS
Video transcript

Slot machines got their name from the fact that people dropped coins through a slot to activate them. Drop a coin, pull the handle, and if the cylinders stop so that the identical pictures painted in them line up, the machine "pays out." Mechanical slot machines, with their wheels, cogs, and gears have changed little in the last century. But today, a slot machine mechanic must also know how to fix the computerized versions, the ones with no moving parts. As a result, they must not only be good with their hands, but also skilled in computer electronics.

Some casinos offer in-house training programs to teach the necessary skills. And most "casino cities," like Las Vegas or Atlantic City, have trade schools or junior colleges with courses on slot machine repair.

After all, slot machines are enormously popular and profitable. If they weren't, casinos wouldn't give them so much floor space. So, if you like to work with both your head an your hands, if you like both mechanics and computers, this could be an ideal job for you.

SNAPSHOT
Install, service, adjust, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, pinball machines, or slot machines.
Leadership
LOW
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
LOW
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
MED
Communication with others
LOW
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
MED
Daily tasks

Replace malfunctioning parts, such as worn magnetic heads on automatic teller machine (ATM) card readers.

Adjust and repair coin, vending, or amusement machines and meters and replace defective mechanical and electrical parts, using hand tools, soldering irons, and diagrams.

Clean and oil machine parts.

Fill machines with products, ingredients, money, and other supplies.

Record transaction information on forms or logs, and notify designated personnel of discrepancies.

Inspect machines and meters to determine causes of malfunctions and fix minor problems such as jammed bills or stuck products.

Maintain records of machine maintenance and repair.

Test machines to determine proper functioning.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Engineering and Technology Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Sales and Marketing Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
TOP SKILLS
Repairing Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Equipment Maintenance Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Troubleshooting Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Quality Control Analysis Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Systems Analysis Determining how a system should work and how changes in conditions, operations, and the environment will affect outcomes.