Skincare Specialists

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Also known as:  Electrolysis Needle Operator, Electrolysis Operator, Electrolysist, Esthetician, Facialist, Licensed Esthetician, Medical Esthetician, Skin Care Technician

ABOUT SKINCARE SPECIALIST CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
Skin care treatment is an increasingly important part of the beauty business. Also called aestheticians, skin care specialists cleanse an beautify skin by giving facials, full-body treatment, head and neck massage, and some kinds of hair removal, such as waxing or electrolysis. Not all skin care spe ...
cialists provide all of these services. It depends where they work and how they're trained and licensed.

Skin care is part of the field of cosmetology, which most states regulate with licensing. Public and private schools offer courses in cosmetology. Skin care education covers the use and care of instruments, hygiene, basic anatomy and physiology, and recognition of certain skin ailments. It's important to know what skin problems should be referred t a health care provider.

Skin care specialists find work in salons, spas, and department stores. They might also become sales representatives for cosmetic firms. As you gain experience, you might open your own business or work as an examiner for a state licensing board. To make this career successful, you need to keep up with new advances in science and treatments, and you should find pleasure in helping other people look their best.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Provide skincare treatments to face and body to enhance an individual's appearance. Includes electrologists and laser hair removal specialists.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
LOW
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
HIGH
Communication with others
LOW
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Advise clients about colors and types of makeup and instruct them in makeup application techniques.
Apply chemical peels to reduce fine lines and age spots.
Refer clients to medical personnel for treatment of serious skin problems.
Determine which products or colors will improve clients' skin quality and appearance.
Sell makeup to clients.
Treat the facial skin to maintain and improve its appearance, using specialized techniques and products, such as peels and masks.
Perform simple extractions to remove blackheads.
Cleanse clients' skin with water, creams, or lotions.
Provide facial and body massages.
Remove body and facial hair by applying wax.
Demonstrate how to clean and care for skin properly and recommend skin-care regimens.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
Selling or Influencing Others Convincing others to buy merchandise/goods or to otherwise change their minds or actions.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Assisting and Caring for Others Providing personal assistance, medical attention, emotional support, or other personal care to others such as coworkers, customers, or patients.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Sales and Marketing Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Public Safety and Security Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Chemistry Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
Psychology Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Speech Clarity The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
Speech Recognition The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Arm-Hand Steadiness The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Information Ordering The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
TOP SKILLS Expand
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Service Orientation Actively looking for ways to help people.
Social Perceptiveness Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Time Management Managing one's own time and the time of others.
Active Learning Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
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