Welders, Cutters, Solderers, and Brazers

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Also known as:
Aluminum Welder, Arc Welder, Brazer, Certified Maintenance Welder, Cutting Torch Operator, Pipe Welder, Silver Solderer, Sub Arc Operator, Welder Fitter, Wire Welder

ABOUT WELDER, CUTTER, SOLDERER, AND BRAZER CAREERS
Video transcript

Welders cut, gouge, finish, and -most importantly - join pieces of metal. Any kind of metal: steel, cast iron, bronze, aluminum, or whatever else the job involves. Welders do their work by literally melting the edges of the metal pieces, forcing the materials to flow together, and then letting them cool to form a solid bond. Often a metal welding rod is melded, as part of the process to supply the additional material needed to complete the weld.

Some welders use torches that produce flames as hot as 6,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Others use electrical current to create an arc between their tools and the work piece. Therefore, protective clothing, including gloves and a helmet with a view plate are essential.

Welding can be a very strenuous job. A welder must be able to work under adverse conditions and have the strength to move heavy objects. Yet, while plastics and other "wonder" materials may get all the headlines, the world is still made of metal. Cars, ships, airplanes, bridges, skyscrapers - all of these require people who can properly and efficiently weld metal.

SNAPSHOT

Use hand-welding, flame-cutting, hand-soldering, or brazing equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes, indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products.

Daily tasks

Check grooves, angles, or gap allowances, using micrometers, calipers, and precision measuring instruments.

Detect faulty operation of equipment or defective materials and notify supervisors.

Develop templates and models for welding projects, using mathematical calculations based on blueprint information.

Chip or grind off excess weld, slag, or spatter, using hand scrapers or power chippers, portable grinders, or arc-cutting equipment.

Determine required equipment and welding methods, applying knowledge of metallurgy, geometry, and welding techniques.

Hammer out bulges or bends in metal workpieces.

Select and install torches, torch tips, filler rods, and flux, according to welding chart specifications or types and thicknesses of metals.

Mark or tag material with proper job number, piece marks, and other identifying marks as required.

Preheat workpieces prior to welding or bending, using torches or heating furnaces.

Weld separately or in combination, using aluminum, stainless steel, cast iron, and other alloys.

Clean or degrease parts, using wire brushes, portable grinders, or chemical baths.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Production and Processing Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Design Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Engineering and Technology Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
TOP SKILLS
Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Quality Control Analysis Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.