Accountants and Auditors

Want help with your hiring? It's easy. Enter your information below, and we'll quickly reach out to discuss your hiring needs.
Loading

Recruiter.com helps professionals in accountant or auditor careers find better opportunities across all specialties and locations. Sign up in our career community today!

Also known as:
Account Auditor, Accountant, Auditor, Auditor-In-Charge, Certified Public Accountant, Cost Accountant, CPA, Field Auditor, Financial Accountant, Financial Auditor

ABOUT ACCOUNTANT OR AUDITOR CAREERS
Video transcript

What's the difference between an accountant and an auditor? Basically, accountants keep track of the money, and auditors check their work. But there's much more to the work than simply "balancing the books." These financial professionals are involved in nearly every area of all types of business, industry, and government.

Budgeting, planning, cost control, employee compensation, asset management, new product development, and of course, taxes. If money's involved, accountants and auditors must be too. In fact, so many areas need accounting and auditing services that many professionals opt to specialize.

Some become tax specialists. Others become employee benefits experts, while still others concentrate on preparing the income statements and balance sheets every publicly held corporation must file.

To take full advantage of the many opportunities, you need to have at least a bachelor's degree in accounting. If you hope to become a "certified public accountant" or "CPA," in many states you will need 150 semester hours of coursework to be eligible to take the state exam.

Unlike most professionals, auditors and accountants have tremendous flexibility in where they work and in the jobs they perform. And, as long as there is money to spend, there will always be jobs to fill and work to do.

SNAPSHOT

Examine, analyze, and interpret accounting records to prepare financial statements, give advice, or audit and evaluate statements prepared by others. Install or advise on systems of recording costs or other financial and budgetary data.

Daily tasks

Audit payroll and personnel records to determine unemployment insurance premiums, workers' compensation coverage, liabilities, and compliance with tax laws.

Inspect cash on hand, notes receivable and payable, negotiable securities, and canceled checks to confirm records are accurate.

Examine inventory to verify journal and ledger entries.

Evaluate taxpayer finances to determine tax liability, using knowledge of interest and discount rates, annuities, valuation of stocks and bonds, and amortization valuation of depletable assets.

Prepare detailed reports on audit findings.

Collect and analyze data to detect deficient controls, duplicated effort, extravagance, fraud, or non-compliance with laws, regulations, and management policies.

Examine and evaluate financial and information systems, recommending controls to ensure system reliability and data integrity.

Confer with company officials about financial and regulatory matters.

Examine whether the organization's objectives are reflected in its management activities, and whether employees understand the objectives.

Supervise auditing of establishments, and determine scope of investigation required.

Establish tables of accounts and assign entries to proper accounts.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Economics and Accounting Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
TOP SKILLS
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Mathematics Using mathematics to solve problems.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Complex Problem Solving Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.