Fire Inspectors

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Also known as:  Arson Investigator, Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator, Certified Fire Investigator, Certified Vehicle Fire Investigator, CFEI, Fire Hazard Inspector, Fire Investigator, Fire Prevention Inspector, Fire Safety Inspector

ABOUT FIRE INSPECTOR CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
Fire inspectors fight fires by trying to keep them from starting. As part of a department's fire prevention division, inspectors examine commercial buildings for compliance with fire codes, looking for conditions that might cause a fire. They may even test the fire extinguishers and smoke alarms. De ...
velopers often call on them to check and approve plans for new structures.

Fire inspectors communicate what they know about preventing fires to the public. They often speak to schools or organizations about fire safety. Many inspectors are also fire investigators, sifting through ashes and debris to find the cause and origin of a blaze. Their conclusions can point to a tragic accident or the need for a criminal investigation.

Firefighting occupations are municipal jobs obtained through written exams, instruction at a training center or academy, or a departmental apprenticeship program. Promotions are based on seniority and examinations. Despite the irregular hours and dangers in firefighting, competition for available openings is expected to stay quite strong.

People are attracted to the field because a high school diploma is generally adequate for entry-level positions, a pension is guaranteed at retirement after 20 years of service, and because few jobs demand as much courage or command as much respect.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Inspect buildings and equipment to detect fire hazards and enforce state and local regulations.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
HIGH
Competition for this position
LOW
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Testify in court regarding fire code and fire safety issues.
Recommend changes to fire prevention, inspection, and fire code endorsement procedures.
Inspect liquefied petroleum installations, storage containers, and transportation and delivery systems for compliance with fire laws.
Conduct fire exit drills to monitor and evaluate evacuation procedures.
Teach public education programs on fire safety and prevention.
Present and explain fire code requirements and fire prevention information to architects, contractors, attorneys, engineers, developers, fire service personnel, and the general public.
Develop or review fire exit plans.
Conduct fire code compliance follow-ups to ensure that corrective actions have been taken in cases where violations were found.
Review blueprints and plans for new or remodeled buildings to ensure the structures meet fire safety codes.
Conduct inspections and acceptance testing of newly installed fire protection systems.
Develop and coordinate fire prevention programs such as false alarm billing, fire inspection reporting, and hazardous materials management.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
Performing for or Working Directly with the Public Performing for people or dealing directly with the public. This includes serving customers in restaurants and stores, and receiving clients or guests.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Public Safety and Security Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Building and Construction Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Inductive Reasoning The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Perceptual Speed The ability to quickly and accurately compare similarities and differences among sets of letters, numbers, objects, pictures, or patterns. The things to be compared may be presented at the same time or one after the other. This ability also includes comparing a presented object with a remembered object.
Flexibility of Closure The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.
Deductive Reasoning The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Quality Control Analysis Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Active Learning Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
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