Librarians and Media Collections Specialists

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Also known as:
Audio Visual Specialist, Audio Visual Technician, Catalog Librarian, Instructional Technology Specialist, Librarian, Library Media Specialist, Media Technician, Multimedia Services Coordinator, Reference Librarian, Technical Services Librarian

ABOUT LIBRARIANS AND MEDIA COLLECTIONS SPECIALIST CAREERS
Video transcript

For readers on the lookout for their next great novel, or students desperate for help with a research project, their local librarian is probably something of a hero. Librarians guide people through the use of the library and the services it offers. Librarians help people find information and conduct research. Many plan community programming such as storytelling for young children. They also perform administrative tasks... from recordkeeping... to choosing materials to add to their collection. Librarians may specialize using their research and information-organizing skills for private businesses, government, law or medical schools and institutions, and for colleges and universities. They must keep up-to-date on their field and relevant resources, such as databases and search engines. Wherever they are employed, librarians use communication, initiative, and interpersonal skills to assist patrons in getting the most out of their local library. Most librarians work full time though part-time opportunities may be available. Some specialist librarians may work overtime to help meet deadlines. Most employers require librarians to have a master's degree in library science. Librarians in specialized fields take courses or earn a degree in that field, such as a law degree, as well as a degree in library science.

SNAPSHOT

Administer and maintain libraries or collections of information, for public or private access through reference or borrowing. Work in a variety of settings, such as educational institutions, museums, and corporations, and with various types of informational materials, such as books, periodicals, recordings, films, and databases. Tasks may include acquiring, cataloging, and circulating library materials, and user services such as locating and organizing information, providing instruction on how to access information, and setting up and operating a library's media equipment.

Daily tasks

Develop library policies and procedures.

Evaluate materials to determine outdated or unused items to be discarded.

Evaluate vendor products and performance, negotiate contracts, and place orders.

Confer with colleagues, faculty, and community members and organizations to conduct informational programs, make collection decisions, and determine library services to offer.

Represent library or institution on internal and external committees.

Engage in professional development activities, such as taking continuing education classes and attending or participating in conferences, workshops, professional meetings, and associations.

Direct and train library staff in duties, such as receiving, shelving, researching, cataloging, and equipment use.

Respond to customer complaints, taking action as necessary.

Troubleshoot problems with audio-visual equipment.

Explain use of library facilities, resources, equipment, and services and provide information about library policies.

Set up, adjust, and operate audio-visual equipment, such as cameras, film and slide projectors, and recording equipment, for meetings, events, classes, seminars, and video conferences.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
Training and Teaching Others Identifying the educational needs of others, developing formal educational or training programs or classes, and teaching or instructing others.
Thinking Creatively Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Communications and Media Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Telecommunications Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.
TOP SKILLS
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Active Learning Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.