Loading Machine Operators, Underground Mining

Recruiter.com helps professionals in underground mining loading machine operator careers find better opportunities across all specialties and locations.





Also known as:  Coke Loader, Joy Loader, Load Haul Dump Operator

ABOUT UNDERGROUND MINING LOADING MACHINE OPERATOR CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
So many of the things that end up making our lives easier started off deep underground. Helping to extract coal, metal and non-metallic minerals from the earth's interior is the job of miners.

Loading machine operators help clear the min of debris. They control machinery equipped with power s ...
hovels, scrapers of scoops, or with gathering arms and a conveyor. Rock, coal or other materials are loaded into the vehicles that will transport them away from the job site.

The work environment is noisy, dim, dusty, and at times, cramped. It can also be dangerous. Even though mining companies are very safety-conscious, and government oversight is strict, moving heavy materials with tons of earth and rock directly overhead comes with a degree of risk.

Though much of the machinery is now computerized and remote-controlled, a mining machine operator must have the stamina to stand or sit for long periods. The increasing introduction of automated tools, while making the job more efficient and safer, is also reducing the number of jobs in this field.

A high school diploma is usually required. Training comes on the job, often through a union apprenticeship. This is a career in which making the investment of time and effort really pays off. Skilled machine operators earn some of the highest salaries in the industry.

SNAPSHOT Expand
Operate underground loading machine to load coal, ore, or rock into shuttle or mine car or onto conveyors. Loading equipment may include power shovels, hoisting engines equipped with cable-drawn scraper or scoop, or machines equipped with gathering arms and conveyor.
Leadership
MED
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
LOW
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
MED
Communication with others
LOW
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
LOW
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
HIGH
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
Want to pursue a career as Underground Mining Loading Machine Operator? Create a job alert, and get new job listings in your area sent directly to you.
DAILY TASKS Expand
Replace hydraulic hoses, headlight bulbs, and gathering-arm teeth.
Drive machines into piles of material blasted from working faces.
Move trailing electrical cables clear of obstructions, using rubber safety gloves.
Operate levers to move conveyor booms or shovels so that mine contents such as coal, rock, and ore can be placed into cars or onto conveyors.
Oil, lubricate, and adjust conveyors, crushers, and other equipment, using hand tools and lubricating equipment.
Pry off loose material from roofs and move it into the paths of machines, using crowbars.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Production and Processing Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
Public Safety and Security Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Transportation Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Control Precision The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Multilimb Coordination The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Manual Dexterity The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
Depth Perception The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Selective Attention The ability to concentrate on a task over a period of time without being distracted.
Arm-Hand Steadiness The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Rate Control The ability to time your movements or the movement of a piece of equipment in anticipation of changes in the speed and/or direction of a moving object or scene.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Coordination Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
Repairing Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Equipment Maintenance Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
There is a better job out there!
Post your resume to the largest network of recruiters on the planet. START