Pharmacy Technicians

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Also known as:  Certified Pharmacy Technician, CPHT, Pharmacist Technician, Pharmacy Laboratory Technician, Pharmacy Technician

ABOUT PHARMACY TECHNICIAN CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
Pharmacists used to fill prescriptions by preparing and dispensing doctor's specified pills, creams and liquids by hand. Today, most medications are manufactured by drug companies and shipped in bulk to pharmacies. As a result, pharmacists are able to focus more on providing clinical services. But s ...
omeone must still measure the doses, count out the pills and type up instructions for the patient. Increasingly, this is the role of the pharmacy technician.

Pharmacy techs always work under the supervision of a registered pharmacist and given the power of today's drugs, they must be extremely detail-oriented, accurate and precision-minded. This is not a profession that tolerates mistakes and slipups. After all, with each prescription someone's life may be at stake.

You'll need a high school diploma and pharmacy tech certification from a community college, votech school or other institution. The aging baby boomer population will guarantee the need for pharmacy technicians for many years to come.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Prepare medications under the direction of a pharmacist. May measure, mix, count out, label, and record amounts and dosages of medications according to prescription orders.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
HIGH
Competition for this position
LOW
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Order, label, and count stock of medications, chemicals, or supplies and enter inventory data into computer.
Operate cash registers to accept payment from customers.
Assist customers by answering simple questions, locating items, or referring them to the pharmacist for medication information.
Establish or maintain patient profiles, including lists of medications taken by individual patients.
Price and file prescriptions that have been filled.
Prepack bulk medicines, fill bottles with prescribed medications, and type and affix labels.
Mix pharmaceutical preparations, according to written prescriptions.
Receive and store incoming supplies, verify quantities against invoices, check for outdated medications in current inventory, and inform supervisors of stock needs and shortages.
Receive written prescription or refill requests and verify that information is complete and accurate.
Maintain proper storage and security conditions for drugs.
Answer telephones, responding to questions or requests.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Organizing, Planning, and Prioritizing Work Developing specific goals and plans to prioritize, organize, and accomplish your work.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Medicine and Dentistry Knowledge of the information and techniques needed to diagnose and treat human injuries, diseases, and deformities. This includes symptoms, treatment alternatives, drug properties and interactions, and preventive health-care measures.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Written Comprehension The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Speech Recognition The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Information Ordering The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
Category Flexibility The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Service Orientation Actively looking for ways to help people.
Social Perceptiveness Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Mathematics Using mathematics to solve problems.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
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