Archeologists

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This occupation has now been updated to Anthropologists and Archeologists

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Also known as:
Anthropologist, Applied Anthropologist, Archaeologist, Ethnoarchaeologist, Medical Anthropologist, Physical Anthropologist, Political Anthropologist, Research Anthropologist, Research Archaeologist

ABOUT ARCHEOLOGIST CAREERS
Video transcript

Finding and uncovering the clues explaining the history of mankind - that's the intriguing work of archeologists. The ruins of building, tools, pottery, and other objects hold the answers to how people lived in the past.

Archaeologists are the social scientists who study these objects to discover their significance. Many archaeologists specialize in a particular region of the world. They may travel to remote areas and live among the people they study. Their work can be under rugged conditions, and a great deal of physical exertion is often required.

Locating artifacts can be tedious and tiring. Once found, they need to be handled delicately. As scientists, archaeologists must make careful measurements and notes, paying great attention to even the tiniest details.

They are training in the latest techniques for preserving and storing the artifacts, often through internships and fieldwork as students. A natural curiosity is invaluable. Archeologists are always looking for new information. Like solving a puzzle, they try to piece together an understanding of the way man lived.

In addition to field and lab work, many archaeologists teach. Most of them have a Ph.D. We would know very little about how our ancestors lived and interacted, if not for the painstaking and meticulous work done by archaeologists.

SNAPSHOT
Study the origin, development, and behavior of human beings. May study the way of life, language, or physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. May engage in systematic recovery and examination of material evidence, such as tools or pottery remaining from past human cultures, in order to determine the history, customs, and living habits of earlier civilizations.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
LOW
Level of responsibilities
MED
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
LOW
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
HIGH
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
Daily tasks

Lead field training sites and train field staff, students, and volunteers in excavation methods.

Create artifact typologies to organize and make sense of past material cultures.

Assess archeological sites for resource management, development, or conservation purposes and recommend methods for site protection.

Collect artifacts made of stone, bone, metal, and other materials, placing them in bags and marking them to show where they were found.

Teach archeology at colleges and universities.

Record the exact locations and conditions of artifacts uncovered in diggings or surveys, using drawings and photographs as necessary.

Develop and test theories concerning the origin and development of past cultures.

Clean, restore, and preserve artifacts.

Create a grid of each site and draw and update maps of unit profiles, stratum surfaces, features, and findings.

Consult site reports, existing artifacts, and topographic maps to identify archeological sites.

Research, survey, or assess sites of past societies and cultures in search of answers to specific research questions.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
History and Archeology Knowledge of historical events and their causes, indicators, and effects on civilizations and cultures.
Sociology and Anthropology Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Geography Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
Education and Training Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
KEY ABILITIES
Inductive Reasoning The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
Information Ordering The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Deductive Reasoning The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
Written Comprehension The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Written Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
Category Flexibility The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
TOP SKILLS
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Science Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Coordination Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
Complex Problem Solving Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.