Commercial Divers

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Also known as:  Commercial Diver, Marine Diver, Non Destructive Testing Underwater Welder, Salvage Diver, Scuba Diver, Submarine Diver, Underwater Welder

ABOUT COMMERCIAL DIVER CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
We usually don't see them, but below the surface of oceans, lakes and rivers, commercial divers are doing a lot of important work. Divers are used to inspect and patch the hulls of ships. They're specially trained in how to attach cables to sunken objects so they can be hoisted to the surface withou ...
t damage.

Divers help install pilings for construction projects, check underwater pipes and cables for break, and they maintain underwater machinery such as pumps. They may search for missing person or objects, or collect police evidence. They may also operate video and other related equipment to investigate underwater structures and marine life.

This is all incredibly demanding work. The simplest activities on the surface take great concentration and physical effort underwater and it is dangerous. Divers often work in the dark, sometimes in confined spaces. They need to be able to remain calm in emergencies--all this while wearing scuba gear, so a diver must be constantly mindful of his remaining supply of oxygen. For deeper, longer dives, they use a special suit tethered to the surface with an air hose and communication wire.

In addition to mastering diving skills, these experts need to know how to weld underwater, and even how to safely rig explosives for construction projects. To get started, a high school diploma or G.E.D. is required. Specialized training is offered by some two-year technical schools, and you need to be in excellent health. Employment prospects in this field look good, so if you think you're qualified to "take the plunge," consider a career as a commercial diver.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Work below surface of water, using scuba gear to inspect, repair, remove, or install equipment and structures. May use a variety of power and hand tools, such as drills, sledgehammers, torches, and welding equipment. May conduct tests or experiments, rig explosives, or photograph structures or marine life.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
HIGH
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
LOW
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Install pilings or footings for piers or bridges.
Remove obstructions from strainers or marine railway or launching ways, using pneumatic or power hand tools.
Recover objects by placing rigging around sunken objects, hooking rigging to crane lines, and operating winches, derricks, or cranes to raise objects.
Perform activities related to underwater search and rescue, salvage, recovery, or cleanup operations.
Set or guide placement of pilings or sandbags to provide support for structures such as docks, bridges, cofferdams, or platforms.
Install, inspect, clean, or repair piping or valves.
Take test samples or photographs to assess the condition of vessels or structures.
Inspect and test docks, ships, buoyage systems, plant intakes or outflows, or underwater pipelines, cables, or sewers, using closed circuit television, still photography, and testing equipment.
Obtain information about diving tasks and environmental conditions.
Repair ships, bridge foundations, or other structures below the water line, using caulk, bolts, and hand tools.
Cut and weld steel, using underwater welding equipment, jigs, and supports.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Repairing and Maintaining Mechanical Equipment Servicing, repairing, adjusting, and testing machines, devices, moving parts, and equipment that operate primarily on the basis of mechanical (not electronic) principles.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Building and Construction Knowledge of materials, methods, and the tools involved in the construction or repair of houses, buildings, or other structures such as highways and roads.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Physics Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
Engineering and Technology Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
Design Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
Arm-Hand Steadiness The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Speech Recognition The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
Manual Dexterity The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
Multilimb Coordination The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Time Management Managing one's own time and the time of others.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Quality Control Analysis Conducting tests and inspections of products, services, or processes to evaluate quality or performance.
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Coordination Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
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