Credit Authorizers, Checkers, and Clerks

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Also known as:
Charge Authorizer, Commercial Credit Reviewer, Credit Authorizer, Credit Charge Authorizer, Credit Checker, Credit Investigator, Credit Processor, Credit Rating Checker, Credit Reference Clerk, Credit Report Checker

See all Finance Careers.

ABOUT CREDIT AUTHORIZER, CHECKERS, AND CLERK CAREERS
Video transcript

Companies know that extending credit is risky business. Credit authorizers, checkers, and clerk work to reduce the risk.

Credit clerks assemble the documents and process the transactions for people applying for loans or credit. Checkers verify what people put down on applications forms. By phone or computer, checkers contact banks, credit bureaus, and other sources for facts about an applicant's earnings, spending, and bill-paying.

Authorizers decide whether to approve or deny the request for a credit account or for a new charge to an existing line of credit. They assess credit histories for accounts that are past due, overextended, or in some way invalid.

People in this field generally work a standard 40-hour week in an office, but shifts can include nights and weekends and may be part-time. You may need to be able to handle the pressures of occasionally dealing with unpleasant people.

Although the use of credit is growing, opportunities in this field are not. Computers are streamlining many checking and authorizing functions. Credit workers usually need only a high school education for an entry level position, so you can expect plenty of competition for these jobs.

Talents that will make you stand out include fluency in another language, especially Spanish, good typing and computer skills and a solid grasp of business math. This is a career where a job done well is certainly a "credit" to your company.

SNAPSHOT

Authorize credit charges against customers' accounts. Investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit. May interview applicants to obtain personal and financial data, determine credit worthiness, process applications, and notify customers of acceptance or rejection of credit.

Daily tasks

Obtain information about potential creditors from banks, credit bureaus, and other credit services, and provide reciprocal information if requested.

Compile and analyze credit information gathered by investigation.

Keep records of customers' charges and payments.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Documenting/Recording Information Entering, transcribing, recording, storing, or maintaining information in written or electronic/magnetic form.
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Establishing and Maintaining Interpersonal Relationships Developing constructive and cooperative working relationships with others, and maintaining them over time.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
Economics and Accounting Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
TOP SKILLS
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Social Perceptiveness Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
Time Management Managing one's own time and the time of others.