Electrical and Electronic Equipment Assemblers

Recruiter.com helps professionals in electrical or electronic equipment assembler careers find better opportunities across all specialties and locations.





Also known as:  Anode Builder, Armature Assembler, Battery Assembler, Battery Builder, Breaker Unit Assembler, Circuit Board Assembler, Computer Assembler, Coping Machine Assembler, Electric Motor Controls Assembler, Electric Sign Assembler

ABOUT ELECTRICAL OR ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT ASSEMBLER CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
Today's complex and increasingly smaller electronic products are put together by electrical and electronic assemblers. Working on a wide range of products, like computers and airplanes, an assembler puts together parts of finished products. The work is often repetitive and generally involves the use ...
of pliers, screwdrivers, soldering irons, power drills and wrenches.

Assemblers who work with wiring and other colored materials may be required to take a color blindness test, since being able to differentiate colors is important. You should also be mechanically inclined, with good hand-eye coordination and be able to do routine work at a steady, rapid pace.

There are no special educational requirements for these jobs, so most electrical and electronic assemblers get their training either on-the-job, or through some type of vocational education. If you have patience, work well with others in close quarters and take pride in turning out quality work, this may be a satisfying position for you.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Assemble or modify electrical or electronic equipment, such as computers, test equipment telemetering systems, electric motors, and batteries.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
LOW
Level of responsibilities
LOW
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
LOW
Communication with others
LOW
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Mark and tag components so that stock inventory can be tracked and identified.
Position, align, or adjust workpieces or electrical parts to facilitate wiring or assembly.
Pack finished assemblies for shipment and transport them to storage areas, using hoists or handtrucks.
Read and interpret schematic drawings, diagrams, blueprints, specifications, work orders, or reports to determine materials requirements or assembly instructions.
Assemble electrical or electronic systems or support structures and install components, units, subassemblies, wiring, or assembly casings, using rivets, bolts, soldering or micro-welding equipment.
Explain assembly procedures or techniques to other workers.
Inspect or test wiring installations, assemblies, or circuits for resistance factors or for operation and record results.
Confer with supervisors or engineers to plan or review work activities or to resolve production problems.
Adjust, repair, or replace electrical or electronic component parts to correct defects and to ensure conformance to specifications.
Clean parts, using cleaning solutions, air hoses, and cloths.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Evaluating Information to Determine Compliance with Standards Using relevant information and individual judgment to determine whether events or processes comply with laws, regulations, or standards.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
Judging the Qualities of Things, Services, or People Assessing the value, importance, or quality of things or people.
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Controlling Machines and Processes Using either control mechanisms or direct physical activity to operate machines or processes (not including computers or vehicles).
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Production and Processing Knowledge of raw materials, production processes, quality control, costs, and other techniques for maximizing the effective manufacture and distribution of goods.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Sales and Marketing Knowledge of principles and methods for showing, promoting, and selling products or services. This includes marketing strategy and tactics, product demonstration, sales techniques, and sales control systems.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Personnel and Human Resources Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Arm-Hand Steadiness The ability to keep your hand and arm steady while moving your arm or while holding your arm and hand in one position.
Finger Dexterity The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.
Manual Dexterity The ability to quickly move your hand, your hand together with your arm, or your two hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble objects.
Oral Expression The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
Oral Comprehension The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
Inductive Reasoning The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
Written Comprehension The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Coordination Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
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