Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers

Recruiter.com helps professionals in heavy or tractor-trailer truck driver careers find better opportunities across all specialties and locations.





Also known as:  Auto Carrier Driver, Cement Truck Driver, Concrete Mixer Driver, Concrete Mixer Truck Driver, Fuel Truck Driver, Garbage Truck Driver, Line Haul Driver, Logging Truck Driver, Moving Van Driver, Over-the-Road Driver

ABOUT HEAVY OR TRACTOR-TRAILER TRUCK DRIVER CAREERS

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT Expand
A heavy truck is a straight truck weighing more than four tons. Most have ten wheels and all have massive engines. Because they are highly customizable, the same basic model can be equipped to serve as a concrete mixer, an airline fuel tanker, a refuse and recycling truck, or even a fire engine.
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It takes skill, experience, and a special touch to control the momentum of a truck carrying tons of material, once it gets up to speed. That's why heavy truck drivers must obtain a special commercial driver's license or "CDL." Training is available, but before paying for a course, make sure that it is certified by the professional truck driver institute of America.

Working conditions can be dirty and noisy. But most drivers in this part of the industry are full-time employees, receiving full benefits packages. Most run are local, so unlike long-distance truck drivers, heavy truck drivers have the added benefit of working close to home.
SNAPSHOT Expand
Drive a tractor-trailer combination or a truck with a capacity of at least 26,000 pounds Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW). May be required to unload truck. Requires commercial drivers' license.
Leadership
LOW
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
LOW
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
HIGH
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
HIGH
Communication with others
LOW
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
LOW
Comfort of the work setting
LOW
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
HIGH
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
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DAILY TASKS Expand
Crank trailer landing gear up or down to safely secure vehicles.
Report vehicle defects, accidents, traffic violations, or damage to the vehicles.
Drive trucks to weigh stations before and after loading and along routes to document weights and to comply with state regulations.
Inventory and inspect goods to be moved to determine quantities and conditions.
Secure cargo for transport, using ropes, blocks, chain, binders, or covers.
Check all load-related documentation to ensure that it is complete and accurate.
Collect delivery instructions from appropriate sources, verifying instructions and routes.
Drive trucks with capacities greater than 3 tons, including tractor-trailer combinations, to transport and deliver products, livestock, or other materials.
Load and unload trucks, or help others with loading and unloading, operating any special loading-related equipment on vehicles and using other equipment as necessary.
Check vehicles to ensure that mechanical, safety, and emergency equipment is in good working order.
Couple or uncouple trailers by changing trailer jack positions, connecting or disconnecting air or electrical lines, or manipulating fifth-wheel locks.
MAIN ACTIVITIES Expand
Operating Vehicles, Mechanized Devices, or Equipment Running, maneuvering, navigating, or driving vehicles or mechanized equipment, such as forklifts, passenger vehicles, aircraft, or water craft.
Inspecting Equipment, Structures, or Material Inspecting equipment, structures, or materials to identify the cause of errors or other problems or defects.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Performing General Physical Activities Performing physical activities that require considerable use of your arms and legs and moving your whole body, such as climbing, lifting, balancing, walking, stooping, and handling of materials.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Identifying Objects, Actions, and Events Identifying information by categorizing, estimating, recognizing differences or similarities, and detecting changes in circumstances or events.
Handling and Moving Objects Using hands and arms in handling, installing, positioning, and moving materials, and manipulating things.
Monitor Processes, Materials, or Surroundings Monitoring and reviewing information from materials, events, or the environment, to detect or assess problems.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE Expand
Transportation Knowledge of principles and methods for moving people or goods by air, rail, sea, or road, including the relative costs and benefits.
Public Safety and Security Knowledge of relevant equipment, policies, procedures, and strategies to promote effective local, state, or national security operations for the protection of people, data, property, and institutions.
Mechanical Knowledge of machines and tools, including their designs, uses, repair, and maintenance.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Personnel and Human Resources Knowledge of principles and procedures for personnel recruitment, selection, training, compensation and benefits, labor relations and negotiation, and personnel information systems.
Clerical Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
KEY ABILITIES Expand
Far Vision The ability to see details at a distance.
Control Precision The ability to quickly and repeatedly adjust the controls of a machine or a vehicle to exact positions.
Multilimb Coordination The ability to coordinate two or more limbs (for example, two arms, two legs, or one leg and one arm) while sitting, standing, or lying down. It does not involve performing the activities while the whole body is in motion.
Near Vision The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
Response Orientation The ability to choose quickly between two or more movements in response to two or more different signals (lights, sounds, pictures). It includes the speed with which the correct response is started with the hand, foot, or other body part.
Depth Perception The ability to judge which of several objects is closer or farther away from you, or to judge the distance between you and an object.
Reaction Time The ability to quickly respond (with the hand, finger, or foot) to a signal (sound, light, picture) when it appears.
Problem Sensitivity The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
TOP SKILLS Expand
Operation and Control Controlling operations of equipment or systems.
Operation Monitoring Watching gauges, dials, or other indicators to make sure a machine is working properly.
Time Management Managing one's own time and the time of others.
Monitoring Monitoring/Assessing performance of yourself, other individuals, or organizations to make improvements or take corrective action.
Troubleshooting Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Repairing Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
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