Zoologists and Wildlife Biologists

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Also known as:
Aquatic Biologist, Entomologist, Fish Culturist, Fishery Biologist, Herpetologist, Ichthyologist, Lepidopterist, Marine Biologist, Migratory Game Bird Biologist, Ornithologist

ABOUT ZOOLOGISTS OR WILDLIFE BIOLOGIST CAREERS
Video transcript

If you like to ask questions, weigh evidence, and solve problems - and you like the idea of your office being the great outdoors, consider a job as a zoologist or a wildlife biologist. Zoologists study animals and how they live and grow in their natural surroundings. They usually specialize in a specific type of animal, scrutinizing its behavior, diseases, and development.

Wildlife biologists are concerned with the preservation of all types of animal and plant life, as well as with their overall environment. Their work is often geared toward managing habitats to protect threatened and endangered species.

Some zoologists and wildlife biologists work regular hours in classrooms and laboratories, so they must be familiar with lab equipment, research techniques, and computers. Others spend their time out in the field enjoying - or enduring - the same conditions as the life forms they're studying.

These scientists may work alone, or as part of a team. They're employed by the government, colleges and universities, utilities, environmental consulting firms, and conservation groups.

Most employers look for at least a master's degree in zoology, microbiology, biochemistry, or a related field. Good writing and speaking skills are often called for. But the greatest assets in this career may be an appreciation of living things, and a fascination with they work and interact.

SNAPSHOT
Study the origins, behavior, diseases, genetics, and life processes of animals and wildlife. May specialize in wildlife research and management. May collect and analyze biological data to determine the environmental effects of present and potential use of land and water habitats.
Leadership
HIGH
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
LOW
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
MED
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
Daily tasks

Check for, and ensure compliance with, environmental laws, and notify law enforcement when violations are identified.

Study animals in their natural habitats, assessing effects of environment and industry on animals, interpreting findings and recommending alternative operating conditions for industry.

Study characteristics of animals, such as origin, interrelationships, classification, life histories, diseases, development, genetics, and distribution.

Inventory or estimate plant and wildlife populations.

Disseminate information by writing reports and scientific papers or journal articles, and by making presentations and giving talks for schools, clubs, interest groups and park interpretive programs.

Inform and respond to public regarding wildlife and conservation issues, such as plant identification, hunting ordinances, and nuisance wildlife.

Make recommendations on management systems and planning for wildlife populations and habitat, consulting with stakeholders and the public at large to explore options.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
Communicating with Persons Outside Organization Communicating with people outside the organization, representing the organization to customers, the public, government, and other external sources. This information can be exchanged in person, in writing, or by telephone or e-mail.
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
Interpreting the Meaning of Information for Others Translating or explaining what information means and how it can be used.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Biology Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Law and Government Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Geography Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
Customer and Personal Service Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Administration and Management Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
TOP SKILLS
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Science Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Writing Communicating effectively in writing as appropriate for the needs of the audience.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Active Learning Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.