The After Interview Phase of Job Search

When you're looking for a job, it's easy to get stressed about job interviews. Interviews make or break your job prospects with a particular employer, and their importance cannot be emphasized enough. However, the post-interview phase is almost as important. How do you communicate effectively with the hiring manager? How do you express your interest in the job without seeming desperate or too aggressive? How do you negotiate during the job offer stage? It's a good idea to go into an interview with the post-interview phase well planned and researched.
RELATED ARTICLES
Create a job alert today and stay on top of new opportunities in your area. Recruiter looks at 6 million jobs daily, and sends you only the ones you care about.
Knocking your future employer dead during the interview is not enough to bag a job. Handling the post-interview phase is important and requires a certain level of tactical and emotional finesse.

It is important to follow up with the interviewer consistently and tactfully. For example, do not become impatient or angry waiting for a follow-up interview or a decision. This means not badgering the company, a move that is likely to ruin your chances. The post-interview phase begins the moment you walk out of the interview room. While your mind is still fresh, write down the questions that you feel needed work, and take notes on anything that you need to follow up on. While you still remember the details of the conversation, but are away from the pressured situation, you can examine the interview from a critical point of view. Irrespective of how well or badly the interview went, it is a learning experience with lessons for the next interview, even if it has to be with a different company.

It should be noted that different employers have very different ways of managing the stage after interviewing. Some may send you formal acknowledgement, while others may rely on the hiring manager to send you a personal note, and still others may have no formal process, or, worse, will go silent if they are not interested in hiring you. None of these responses (except eternal silence) necessarily indicates either success or failure in the interview.

Your personal follow-up can make all the difference in landing the job. Following the cues of the hiring manager, follow up consistently and politely. Have a formal process and use available tools, such as templates and articles on these communications. If you are using a recruiter, (s)he might perform quite a bit of the follow-up for you, but make sure that you are being courteously and proactively represented and presented.
There is a better job out there!
Post your resume to the largest network of recruiters on the planet. START