Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers

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Also known as:
Bio-Mechanical Engineer, Biochemical Engineer, Biomaterials Engineer, Biomedical Engineer, Dialysis Engineer, Genetic Engineer

ABOUT BIOENGINEER AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEER CAREERS
Video transcript

Biomedical engineers are people who develop technologies that help save lives. They combine biology and medicine with engineering and mechanics. It's a combination that leads to amazing results. Imaging systems that allow doctors to see inside a patient's organs; artificial limbs, organs and joints; lasers for surgery - all are the work of biomedical engineers.

Many colleges and universities offer a biomedical engineering degree. Specialties include such areas as genetic engineering, medical imaging, rehabilitation engineering, biomaterials, biomechanics, and bioinstrumentation.

Most jobs are found in research laboratories often run by a medical manufacturing company, a university or by the government. Expect to spend many hours, even years on a specific project - researching, developing, failing, and trying again.

Among the talents needed are patience, problem-solving skills, and the ability to handle complex calculations. Also required is a passion to find a way to make a patient's life longer or easier.

SNAPSHOT
Apply knowledge of engineering, biology, chemistry, computer science, and biomechanical principles to the design, development, and evaluation of biological, agricultural, and health systems and products, such as artificial organs, prostheses, instrumentation, medical information systems, and health management and care delivery systems.
Leadership
MED
Critical decision making
HIGH
Level of responsibilities
HIGH
Job challenge and pressure to meet deadlines
MED
Dealing and handling conflict
LOW
Competition for this position
HIGH
Communication with others
HIGH
Work closely with team members, clients etc.
HIGH
Comfort of the work setting
HIGH
Exposure to extreme environmental conditions
LOW
Exposure to job hazards
LOW
Physical demands
LOW
Daily tasks

Advise hospital administrators on the planning, acquisition, and use of medical equipment.

Analyze new medical procedures to forecast likely outcomes.

Research new materials to be used for products, such as implanted artificial organs.

Develop models or computer simulations of human biobehavioral systems to obtain data for measuring or controlling life processes.

Write documents describing protocols, policies, standards for use, maintenance, and repair of medical equipment.

Adapt or design computer hardware or software for medical science uses.

Conduct training or in-services to educate clinicians and other personnel on proper use of equipment.

Evaluate the safety, efficiency, and effectiveness of biomedical equipment.

Conduct research, along with life scientists, chemists, and medical scientists, on the engineering aspects of the biological systems of humans and animals.

MAIN ACTIVITIES
Making Decisions and Solving Problems Analyzing information and evaluating results to choose the best solution and solve problems.
Analyzing Data or Information Identifying the underlying principles, reasons, or facts of information by breaking down information or data into separate parts.
Getting Information Observing, receiving, and otherwise obtaining information from all relevant sources.
Interacting With Computers Using computers and computer systems (including hardware and software) to program, write software, set up functions, enter data, or process information.
Processing Information Compiling, coding, categorizing, calculating, tabulating, auditing, or verifying information or data.
Thinking Creatively Developing, designing, or creating new applications, ideas, relationships, systems, or products, including artistic contributions.
Updating and Using Relevant Knowledge Keeping up-to-date technically and applying new knowledge to your job.
Communicating with Supervisors, Peers, or Subordinates Providing information to supervisors, co-workers, and subordinates by telephone, in written form, e-mail, or in person.
AREAS OF KNOWLEDGE
Engineering and Technology Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.
Mathematics Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
Computers and Electronics Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
Design Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
Biology Knowledge of plant and animal organisms, their tissues, cells, functions, interdependencies, and interactions with each other and the environment.
Physics Knowledge and prediction of physical principles, laws, their interrelationships, and applications to understanding fluid, material, and atmospheric dynamics, and mechanical, electrical, atomic and sub- atomic structures and processes.
English Language Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
Chemistry Knowledge of the chemical composition, structure, and properties of substances and of the chemical processes and transformations that they undergo. This includes uses of chemicals and their interactions, danger signs, production techniques, and disposal methods.
TOP SKILLS
Critical Thinking Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
Complex Problem Solving Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.
Judgment and Decision Making Considering the relative costs and benefits of potential actions to choose the most appropriate one.
Active Listening Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
Reading Comprehension Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.
Science Using scientific rules and methods to solve problems.
Speaking Talking to others to convey information effectively.
Systems Evaluation Identifying measures or indicators of system performance and the actions needed to improve or correct performance, relative to the goals of the system.